CB2

CB2 is primarily expressed in the immune cells and tissues of the body. Like CB1, CB2 is a G protein-coupled receptor which inhibits adenylyl cyclase and consequently lowers cAMP upon activation. This, in turn, regulates many second messenger pathways.

Bulimia

cannabinoids and endocannabinoids are known to strongly affect eating behavior. THC typically induces hunger and THCV suppresses it.

Autism

autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impaired social interaction, verbal and non-verbal communication, and restricted and repetitive behavior.

Anorexia

One of the best-known effects of cannabis is that it can give you the munchies. This effect can be exploited to stimulate eating in anorexia patients. Both clinical and preclinical data indicate that THC is a strong appetite stimulator. More research is required to refine appetite modulation by cannabinoids.

Parkinson's

Parkinson's Disease is a degenerative disorder of the nervous system marked by accelerated degeneration of dopamine-producing neurons in the Substantia Nigra in the brain.

Typical symptoms of Parkinson's Disease , such as (intentional) tremor, rigidity and slowness of movement are mostly ascribed to degenerating Substantia Nigra neurons.

TRPA1

TRPA1 is best known as a sensor for environmental irritants, pain, cold and stretch.

Addiction

Addiction is a complex physiological phenomenon that is intimately linked to the dopamine neurotransmitter system. Neurons in the dopamine system are studded with cannabinoid receptors (like CB1) which explains the addictive properties of cannabinoid substances.

Glioblastoma

Glioblastoma is a malignant brain tumor originated in brain cells called astrocytes. Glioblastoma is one of the most promising targets for cannabinoid therapy.

Cav3.3

Cav3.3 is a calcium channel of the T-type that is involved in many brain processes. Contrary to other calcium channels Cav3.3 is activated by relatively low/negative voltages. Cav3.3 is not a classic cannabinoid receptor but its activity is modulated by cannabinoids.

Cav3.2

Cav3.2 is a calcium channel of the T-type that is involved in many processes in the brain and other tissues. Contrary to other calcium channels Cav3.2 is activated by relatively low/negative voltages. Cav3.2 is not a classic cannabinoid receptor but its activity is modulated by cannabinoids.