CB1

CB1 is the main cannabinoid receptor in the brain but is also found in other tissues. CB1 is a G protein-coupled receptor which inhibits adenylyl cyclase and consequently reduces cAMP upon activation. This in turn regulates many second messenger pathways.

2AGE/Noladin

Suspected cannabinoid that binds to several cannabinoid receptors.

2AG

2AG is a major endocannabinoid produced from lipids in cellular membranes, mostly but not exclusively in response to cellular activity.

Anandamide

Anandamide was the first identified endocannabinoid, named after the Sanskrit 'ananda' for inner bliss. Anandamide is produced from lipids in cellular membranes throughout the body.

TRPV1

TRPV1 is part of the transient receptor potential family and is one of the non-GPCR cannabinoid receptors. TRPV1 is involved in thermoregulation and pain detection (nociception).

CB2

CB2 is primarily expressed in the immune cells and tissues of the body. Like CB1, CB2 is a G protein-coupled receptor which inhibits adenylyl cyclase and consequently lowers cAMP upon activation. This, in turn, regulates many second messenger pathways.

PPARγ

PPARγ is part of the nuclear receptor family and one of the non-GPCR cannabinoid receptors. PPARγ is involved in the regulation of fat cells/adipose tissue, insulin sensitivity and inflammation.

Epilepsy

cannabinoids have excellent therapeutic potential in Epilepsy. In the brain, cannabinoids tend to keep neuronal activity wihtin acceptable boundaries.

Cav3.2

Cav3.2 is a calcium channel of the T-type that is involved in many processes in the brain and other tissues. Contrary to other calcium channels Cav3.2 is activated by relatively low/negative voltages.

Eczema

Eczema or dermatitis is a (chronic) inflammation of the skin. Eczema is marked by itchy skin and crusty skin lesions. It is not known what exactly causes Eczema but an over-active immune system may at least be part of the cause.