CB1

CB1 is the main cannabinoid receptor in the brain but is also found in other tissues. CB1 is a G protein-coupled receptor which inhibits adenylyl cyclase and consequently reduces cAMP upon activation. This in turn regulates many second messenger pathways.

5HT3A

Adenosine A(2A)

Adenosine A2A Receptor is involved in neuroprotective action of CBD in Hypoxic-Isquemic injuries

TRPV1

TRPV1 is part of the transient receptor potential family and is one of the non-GPCR cannabinoid receptors. TRPV1 is involved in thermoregulation and pain detection (nociception).

PPARγ

PPARγ is part of the nuclear receptor family and one of the non-GPCR cannabinoid receptors. PPARγ is involved in the regulation of fat cells/adipose tissue, insulin sensitivity and inflammation.

GPR55

GPR55 is a G protein-coupled receptor which binds with G protein G13. GPR55 stimulates RhoA, Cdc42 and Rac1 upon activation, suggesting a role in cell division and growth.

CB2

CB2 is primarily expressed in the immune cells and tissues of the body. Like CB1, CB2 is a G protein-coupled receptor which inhibits adenylyl cyclase and consequently lowers cAMP upon activation. This, in turn, regulates many second messenger pathways.

5-HT1A

5-HT1A is a serotonin receptor. 5-HT1A is not a classic cannabinoid receptor but its activity is modulated by cannabinoids. Since cannabinoids have a physiological effect on 5-HT1A it is effectively a cannabinoid receptor.

PPARα

PPARα is part of the nuclear receptor family and is therefore one of the non-GPCR cannabinoid receptors. PPAR-alpha is a transcription factor and a major regulator of lipid metabolism in the liver. Low energy typically stimulates PPARα, but PPARα has also been implicated in neuroprotection.

α2r

α2 receptors are classically known as adrenalin receptors. However, α2 receptors also bind CBG at very high affinity and are therefore also cannabinoid receptors. The interaction between CBG and α2 receptors may be relevant in the treatment of pain and depression, but more research is required.